fuckyeahvintageillustration:

azertip:

René Gruau

René Gruau (4 February 1909 – 31 March 2004) was a renowned fashion illustrator whose exaggerated portrayal of fashion design through painting has had a lasting effect on the fashion industry.

3,670 notes

sosuperawesome:

Takmaj, on Tumblr

Shop

(via craft-ish)

4,589 notes

lionofchaeronea:

Albert Bierstadt Day:
Storm in the Mountains, Albert Bierstadt, 1870

lionofchaeronea:

Albert Bierstadt Day:

Storm in the Mountains, Albert Bierstadt, 1870

28 notes

andatsea:

River burn.

andatsea:

River burn.

(Source: 3daysmarch.net)

3,619 notes

andatsea:

Your finger upon the world; your smile behind your back.

(Source: 3daysmarch.net, via birdstump)

1,674 notes

jtotheizzoe:

kqedscience:

Famous Sunset Paintings Reflect Key Air Pollution Events From the Past
“Researchers in Greece recently found that sunset paintings by artists such as J.M.W. Turnerand Edgar Degas accurately reflect contemporary pollution events—specifically, the 54 major volcanic eruptions since 1522. As the industrial age dawned and man-made particles began to fill the air, the paintings tracked that too.”
Learn more from Danna Staaf at KQED Science.

Tracking atmospheric science through fine art? I Louvre this.

jtotheizzoe:

kqedscience:

Famous Sunset Paintings Reflect Key Air Pollution Events From the Past

Researchers in Greece recently found that sunset paintings by artists such as J.M.W. Turnerand Edgar Degas accurately reflect contemporary pollution events—specifically, the 54 major volcanic eruptions since 1522. As the industrial age dawned and man-made particles began to fill the air, the paintings tracked that too.”

Learn more from Danna Staaf at KQED Science.

Tracking atmospheric science through fine art? I Louvre this.

803 notes

amanofletters said: When you first got into comics, did you feel like you were better at, or more interested in, the drawing or the writing? I want to make my own comics, but I feel like my art straggles behind my writing. How can I cause these two aspects of comic-making to come together within myself, and make the works I want to make?

faitherinhicks:

Oh hey, this is something I think a lot about, actually! So when I started making comics (15 years ago this month, haha), I was really terrible at drawing. And I wanted to do, y’know, GRAPHIC NOVELS, with fairly realistically drawn characters and backgrounds and things that are hard to draw. Things that I didn’t really have the skills to draw at the time. So I’d draw my comics and the art was generally pretty terrible. But I was comfortable with writing, and that helped me keep going with making comics, because I enjoyed the storytelling aspect of them so much. 

It’s hard when you feel pretty okay about your writing but your art doesn’t measure up. I kind of feel like my art still doesn’t measure up to what I want it to be (mostly right now I want it to be Hiromu Arakawa, which will never happen, no matter how much I practice), but I’m very comfortable with the writing part of comics, so I look at that as my great strength in my work. It makes up for where my art is lacking, and I work hard at writing to make the sum total of my work better than if I was just writing or just drawing.

I mean, the absolute best thing about comics (to me) is that you don’t need to be a spectacular artist to make really great, involving comics. I’m not an amazing technical artist. During my down times, I don’t draw gorgeous illustrations or do amazing paintings (I kind of dislike doing that kind of thing, to be honest). I will never be Gillian Tamaki. But I’m good at storytelling, and I’m good at interpreting emotion and drawing that on the comic page. So I work to my strengths, which is making stories about engaging characters, and laying out scenes where there is a lot of emotion running through them, and people who like my comics don’t seem to mind that my art is not as great as Gillian Tamaki or Hiromu Arakawa.

Comics aren’t just art or just writing, they’re the two combined to make something new and wonderful. They are more than the sum of their parts. So work hard to because a decent artist with a good grasp of storytelling basics (this is super important!), and work harder to become a truly excellent writer and storyteller, and you can quite possibly make great comics! It worked for me. :)

250 notes

lissabt:

My piece for Q-Pops Monkey King show.Guys it’s happening TOMORROW in beautiful Downtown LA! Sadly i won’t be able to make it to the opening myself, but there’s so much amazing work in this show, it’s going to be… BANANAS?

lissabt:

My piece for Q-Pops Monkey King show.
Guys it’s happening TOMORROW in beautiful Downtown LA! Sadly i won’t be able to make it to the opening myself, but there’s so much amazing work in this show, it’s going to be… BANANAS?

(via angelophile)

"

People still think of critics only as those writers who are telling you whether or not you should read a book or see a film or purchase an album.

Bullshit. The role of the critic is, for me, about connection. How many books have you read that no one else you know has read? It happens to me all the time. There are simply too many books, too many authors, for any two people to have read the same exact list of works. How sad to let all your thoughts and feelings about a given text languish. Well, that’s where critics come in. Through them, I can finally have an enlightened conversation about literature. The critic becomes a stand-in friend so that I can contrast my response to a book against theirs.

"

In reviewing Dani Shapiro’s Still Writing: The Perils and Pleasures of the Creative Life (one of 2013’s best books on writing and creativity) and Wendy Lesser’s Why I Read: The Serious Pleasure of BooksThe Rumpus's Jonathan Russell Clark offers a beautiful meditation on criticism itself.

Relatedly, some time ago I wrote about the role of the critic as a celebrator for Harvard’s Nieman Reports.

(via explore-blog)

(Source: explore-blog, via creepingmonsterism)

272 notes