Breaking news: not every disabled character is secretly queer!

ununnilium:

lupinatic:

So Elsa of ‘Frozen’ has psychological issues stemming from being taught to hate herself, keep others safe from her, and hide a condition she was born with that causes her body to do things that other people’s don’t. But that’s not a mental illness or disability acceptance narrative, it’s a queer acceptance and coming-out one? Okay.

Remus Lupin of ‘Harry Potter’ has psychological issues stemming from being taught to hate himself, keep others safe from him and to hide a condition he’s had almost his whole life that causes his body and brain to do things other people’s don’t. But that shouldn’t have been a disability narrative, it should have been a queer one instead… and his queerness, not his explicitly stigmatized condition and the resulting self-hatred, was the reason he was distressed upon entering a committed relationship with a woman? Also, his disease being a parallel to a real life stigmatised disease with some gay associations means it’s an insult if he isn’t gay because JKR is implying it isn’t a gays-only disease (an idea which got a lot of LGBT people killed in panic), and she totally should have implied exactly that? Uh, okay?

Tonks of ‘Harry Potter’ (the woman whom Remus Lupin is in that relationship, incidentally) showing symptoms of depression is a sign of weakness and neediness despite explicitly having mental health issues running through her mother’s side of the family and having her entire society plunge into war and terrorism at the time of her depression, because she was supposed to remain colourful and tomboyish in order to be relatable for queer little girls? Oh, okay.

Toph Bei Fong of ‘Avatar: The Last Airbender/Legend of Aang’ leaving her parents to follow her own path has nothing to do with claiming her personhood and competance despite her disability, and everything to do with a coming out of the closet analogy because they tried to make her meek, vulnerable and feminine? Also, Toph earthbent Lin into existence because you know Toph Bei McAwesomesauce could have never had Lin by means of anything so pedestrian and heteronormative as a biological father? OKAY THEN IF YOU SAY SO. (You think I’m making this one up, don’t you? I’m not.)

Dear able-bodied, neurotypical queer fans: yes, you deserve narratives where queerness is both explicit and positive. But why, out of all the narratives of healthy straight white people you could hijack and claim for your own, it’s almost always the narratives of disabled/chronically ill/mentally ill characters? Especially the ones that portray us as three dimensional human beings? Do you know how rare it is for a disabled character to be portrayed as having issues and genuinely struggling with said issues while still being portrayed as positive and likeable characters anyway? Do you realise how many Good Cripples are out there in fiction, who are granted equal status to other characters only due to expressing superhuman patience and endurance in the face of suffering and intolerance? Do you realise how many characters representing us are out there for the sole purpose of being Good Cripples and/or inspiration porn, both in-universe and out-of-universe? For people to complain that Remus Lupin failing to remain the Good Cripple or Tonks actually succumbing to depression was out of character because they should have been totally gay in both the sexuality and upbeat senses, or that Elsa and Toph’s real story is one of coming out of the closet, derails what is an incredibly valuable narrative for us.

Please derail someone else’s narratives for a change. You deserve your narratives, but not at the expense of outright stealing ours and calling us queerphobic when we object to the theft. Because we aren’t exactly swimming in a plethora of well-rounded options either.

Okay, so, I wanted to respond to this with angry venom, but both queer and disabled fans deserve more than that. So:

You’re right in that saying that any of these characters don’t count as disabled, or that their disability is just a metaphor for queerness, is wrong, and shows a fairly messed-up worldview to boot.

However, what I read this post as is “if these characters are disabled, then they can’t be queer - if they’re queer, then they’re hijacking disabled narratives”. And that’s just not true. I mean, it’s not like the two things don’t overlap in real life. Reading Elsa as a lesbian with anxiety issues is pretty well-supported by the text.

I read the OP as a critique specifically of queer fans without disabilities taking canonical disability narratives, erasing the disability of the narratives and replacing them with queerness, and then accusing fans with disabilities of bigotry when they point out their narratives are being erased. The dichotomizing language I saw as paraphrasing of the arguments non-disabled queer fans use to erase disability: in other words, the people behaving as though queerness and disability can’t co-exist are the same ones lupinatic is critiquing.

I wish I’d seen lupinatic’s original tags at the time I first reblogged because I think they underline zir position:

if you’re not disabled chronically ill or MI then these aren’t your struggles to stealjust don’t do itthese characters are disabled and if they were queer their disability wouldn’t disappearwe are just as deserving of representation as you areactually disabledactually queergetting real tired of this bullshit

261 notes

Breaking news: not every disabled character is secretly queer!

lupinatic:

So Elsa of ‘Frozen’ has psychological issues stemming from being taught to hate herself, keep others safe from her, and hide a condition she was born with that causes her body to do things that other people’s don’t. But that’s not a mental illness or disability acceptance narrative, it’s a queer acceptance and coming-out one? Okay.

Remus Lupin of ‘Harry Potter’ has psychological issues stemming from being taught to hate himself, keep others safe from him and to hide a condition he’s had almost his whole life that causes his body and brain to do things other people’s don’t. But that shouldn’t have been a disability narrative, it should have been a queer one instead… and his queerness, not his explicitly stigmatized condition and the resulting self-hatred, was the reason he was distressed upon entering a committed relationship with a woman? Also, his disease being a parallel to a real life stigmatised disease with some gay associations means it’s an insult if he isn’t gay because JKR is implying it isn’t a gays-only disease (an idea which got a lot of LGBT people killed in panic), and she totally should have implied exactly that? Uh, okay?

Tonks of ‘Harry Potter’ (the woman whom Remus Lupin is in that relationship, incidentally) showing symptoms of depression is a sign of weakness and neediness despite explicitly having mental health issues running through her mother’s side of the family and having her entire society plunge into war and terrorism at the time of her depression, because she was supposed to remain colourful and tomboyish in order to be relatable for queer little girls? Oh, okay.

Toph Bei Fong of ‘Avatar: The Last Airbender/Legend of Aang’ leaving her parents to follow her own path has nothing to do with claiming her personhood and competance despite her disability, and everything to do with a coming out of the closet analogy because they tried to make her meek, vulnerable and feminine? Also, Toph earthbent Lin into existence because you know Toph Bei McAwesomesauce could have never had Lin by means of anything so pedestrian and heteronormative as a biological father? OKAY THEN IF YOU SAY SO. (You think I’m making this one up, don’t you? I’m not.)

Dear able-bodied, neurotypical queer fans: yes, you deserve narratives where queerness is both explicit and positive. But why, out of all the narratives of healthy straight white people you could hijack and claim for your own, it’s almost always the narratives of disabled/chronically ill/mentally ill characters? Especially the ones that portray us as three dimensional human beings? Do you know how rare it is for a disabled character to be portrayed as having issues and genuinely struggling with said issues while still being portrayed as positive and likeable characters anyway? Do you realise how many Good Cripples are out there in fiction, who are granted equal status to other characters only due to expressing superhuman patience and endurance in the face of suffering and intolerance? Do you realise how many characters representing us are out there for the sole purpose of being Good Cripples and/or inspiration porn, both in-universe and out-of-universe? For people to complain that Remus Lupin failing to remain the Good Cripple or Tonks actually succumbing to depression was out of character because they should have been totally gay in both the sexuality and upbeat senses, or that Elsa and Toph’s real story is one of coming out of the closet, derails what is an incredibly valuable narrative for us.

Please derail someone else’s narratives for a change. You deserve your narratives, but not at the expense of outright stealing ours and calling us queerphobic when we object to the theft. Because we aren’t exactly swimming in a plethora of well-rounded options either.

(via nerdyhbic)

"Another myth that is firmly upheld is that disabled people are dependent and non-disabled people are independent. No one is actually independent. This is a myth perpetuated by disablism and driven by capitalism - we are all actually interdependent. Chances are, disabled or not, you don’t grow all of your food. Chances are, you didn’t build the car, bike, wheelchair, subway, shoes, or bus that transports you. Chances are you didn’t construct your home. Chances are you didn’t sew your clothing (or make the fabric and thread used to sew it). The difference between the needs that many disabled people have and the needs of people who are not labelled as disabled is that non-disabled people have had their dependencies normalized. The world has been built to accommodate certain needs and call the people who need those things independent, while other needs are considered exceptional. Each of us relies on others every day. We all rely on one another for support, resources, and to meet our needs. We are all interdependent. This interdependence is not weakness; rather, it is a part of our humanity."

AJ Withers Disability Politics and Theory p109 (via dandyfied)

This, this, thisssssss.

(via goldenheartedrose)

(via crossedwires)

17,880 notes

"A woman from the audience asks: ‘Why were there so few women among the Beat writers?’ and [Gregory] Corso, suddenly utterly serious, leans forward and says: “There were women, they were there, I knew them, their families put them in institutions, they were given electric shock. In the ’50s if you were male you could be a rebel, but if you were female your families had you locked up."

Stephen Scobie, on the Naropa Institute’s 1994 tribute to Allen Ginsberg (via fuckyeahbeatniks)

(via aintgotnoladytronblues)

Tumblr, I'm begging you.

heartofhallie:

Remember that petition about organ transplants being denied for autistic people that was going around about 2 weeks ago?
During those two weeks, it’s gotten maybe 2,000 signatures.
In the next 4 days (by Friday, December 14th) it needs 16,457 more. 

Or it doesn’t pass.

(via sarah531)

14,898 notes

Petitioning the White House to stop transplant discrimination against autistic people

snailchimera:

girljanitor:

placeholderbutt:

allisticntprivilege:

allisticntprivilege:

We have until December 14 to get 25,000 signatures on it. You need to live in the USA, and you should seriously sign, signal boost, tumblr bomb, anything you can. Lives are on the line- lives of people like me.

Reminder.

Um, do people not understand that this so so people with autism can get life-saving organ transplants, instead of given a death sentence on the grounds that our lives are inherently worthless?

Do you think this doesn’t happen to young adults?

23-Year-Old Autistic Man Denied Heart Transplant at UPenn Hospital

Do you think this doesn’t happen to children with various developmental disorders?

3-Year-Old Amelia Rivera Denied Kidney Transplant

Do you think this doesn’t happen to adults with Down’s Syndrome?

32-Year-Old Sandra Jensen Denied Heart Transplant

UNTIL THE 1990’s, “mental retardation”, meaning any sort of cognitive impairment, was considered “contraindication” for receiving a livesaving organ transplant(link opens as PDF)

“Contraindicated.” That quite literally means that they considered saving a cognitively impaired person’s life HARMFUL.

signal boost

(via fairyfightingtype)

4,687 notes

content warning: discussion of ableism

astheshadowslovethecastle:

The more I think about it, the more I really love Joan Watson’s job.

For two reasons, and both are because her being paid for putting up with his shit explicitly identifies his shit as something one shouldn’t normally have to put up with without incentive, just as part of a friendship.

First, she is the first Watson that I know of who isn’t just tolerating his crap out of a sense of friendship. She is paid, it is her job - and her job isn’t just to sit there and to take it passively but to monitor it and shut him down when necessary. It explicitly separates this kind of behaviour from a lovely perfect friendship - she can become his friend, and surely will, but his abusive crap is not part and parcel of the friendship that she just accepts - it is a symptom and a problem and something she is there to help solve. It normalizes neither his behaviour nor her tolerance and it doesn’t paint her tolerance as just self-sacrifice. Because it isn’t okay to deal with that level of crap from a friend; no one deserves that.

Second, it means it isn’t yet another narrative of the long-suffering martyr of a neurotypical ‘friend’ putting up with their neurodivergent companion. Because you know what? People do not ’put up’ with us. They treat us like shit regularly. And even a show like BBC Sherlock that shows what a dick Watson can be doesn’t seem to realise what it is showing and the showrunners and especially a fandom buy into this martyr trope for John.* This martyr trope that, not to put too fine a point on it, gets people like us killed whilst our murderers get sympathy because really we were so difficult. This trope that gets us abused - I mean if you are calling me heartless and sociopathic and then occasionally going gosh you really have feelings what a revelation when I cry over my cat’s illness, this is not you putting up with my cold, mean, awfulness, but you being abusive.**

 Really, NTs do not put up with us nearly as much as they think - really a lot of it is the other way around and although the show that shows that may not be made in my lifetime, at least this one isn’t, so far, supporting that dangerous narrative where neurotypicals are victimized by our presence but because they are so lovely let us be our difficult awful selves and aren’t they so wonderful for doing that.

*(Yes he has PTSD but the way he is treated by the narrative explicitly situates him as the ‘normal’ one in the partnership so for these purposes he counts for that.)

*This goes out to an ex-boyfriend of mine, fuck you D.

(via ladystonehugs)

whirlerdog:

Help my autistic son get a life-saving heart transplant

goldenheartedrose:

feministrocker:

Folks, a 23-year-old autistic man named Paul Corby is being denied a heart transplant - simply because he has autism. The doctor expressed more interest in the fact that he could not name all his medications (of which he takes 19), and the the fact that he carries a Princess Peach doll for comfort - than the fact that he has never smoked or drank alcohol. This is discrimination, pure and simple - and this cannot stand.

Please sign the petition, so that he can get the heart transplant that he needs. And please reblog - so that this can reach as many people as possible.

(via heliotropo)

1,834 notes

(ableism)

tuxedomarmot:

bonebiting:

here’s your daily reminder that “sociopath” is not a word for “bad person who does bad things”, so please don’t use it as such

 #also for reference it is not an actual diagnosis #its a way of pathologizing people society deems unacceptable#and is actually often used to villainize folks on the autistic spectrum #things to think about

Yep, pretty much.

(Source: sidhebones, via heliotropo)

346 notes

[content notes: racism, classism, ableism and discussion thereof.]
niqaeli:

torayot:

misschaos13:

hillarybuckholtz:

A japanese ice-cream vending machine! with crazy flavors such as purple sweet potato, almond jelly, pudding, lavender, and “full maturity melon.”

I kind of want to try these now x3

bet people wouldn’t be describing the ice cream flavours as ~crazy~ if they were a) named in French and b) served in a French restaurant all dainty-do and mango coulis
BECAUSE THEN IT WOULD BE ~*~*AVANT GARDE MODERN CUISINE~*~* blobviously

To be honest, some people would.  It’d be a completely different thing, though, because it would be mostly completely different people who would be calling it crazy: it wouldn’t be ‘oh, those crazy Japanese, lol, isn’t this amazing’, it’d be more like ‘those crazy gourmet nuts, who the fuck eats ice cream like that?’  Which would make it’d be more of a class/artisan tension thing.  And of course it would still a race thing, because the reason it would be reading as a class/artisan thing is because reframing it and renaming it as something that gets read as ‘white people food’ DOES mean people react differently.
Long story short: exoticising foods from other countries is skeezy and is a thing you are doing when you go ‘so many crazy flavors!’ at things like.  Normalising food because it came from a background that is, well, white is also skeezy and is also a thing people do.
(Seriously, I’m at the point where I want to punch people over stuff like this all the time and it’s not even aggression in my direction since I’m, um, just a white chick who likes a lot of foods and is just fucking tired of hearing about how ~wacky~ some of them are.)

Not to mention there’s all the ableist aspects of referring to food one finds odd as “crazy,” “wacky,” etc — not just weird, puzzling or gross but mentally disturbed.
As a mixed race, third culture kid who grew up with a lot of foods that Westerners (esp. white ones) consider wacky/crazy/gross, and who didn’t grow up with many foods that Westerners consider perfectly normal, I get really frustrated with this mindset. Like, people will make this giant production about how bizarre or gross it is to eat durian, say, or tofu — then turn around and happily chow down on chili cheese fries or whatever. I promise, it’s just as weird if you didn’t grow up with it! (Possibly even weirder, given the possible conflicts with religious dietary restrictions and so on.)
I’m aware there are regional Western foods that are subject to a certain amount of confusion or ridicule from other Westerners as well — haggis, poutine, etc. — but I only rarely encounter the same kind of prurient vehemence in those discussions as I see in ones about non-Western foods. (And when they do there’s usually some kind of classism, nationalism or other kind of -ism at play, anyway.)

[content notes: racism, classism, ableism and discussion thereof.]

niqaeli:

torayot:

misschaos13:

hillarybuckholtz:

A japanese ice-cream vending machine! with crazy flavors such as purple sweet potato, almond jelly, pudding, lavender, and “full maturity melon.”

I kind of want to try these now x3

bet people wouldn’t be describing the ice cream flavours as ~crazy~ if they were a) named in French and b) served in a French restaurant all dainty-do and mango coulis

BECAUSE THEN IT WOULD BE ~*~*AVANT GARDE MODERN CUISINE~*~* blobviously

To be honest, some people would.  It’d be a completely different thing, though, because it would be mostly completely different people who would be calling it crazy: it wouldn’t be ‘oh, those crazy Japanese, lol, isn’t this amazing’, it’d be more like ‘those crazy gourmet nuts, who the fuck eats ice cream like that?’  Which would make it’d be more of a class/artisan tension thing.  And of course it would still a race thing, because the reason it would be reading as a class/artisan thing is because reframing it and renaming it as something that gets read as ‘white people food’ DOES mean people react differently.

Long story short: exoticising foods from other countries is skeezy and is a thing you are doing when you go ‘so many crazy flavors!’ at things like.  Normalising food because it came from a background that is, well, white is also skeezy and is also a thing people do.

(Seriously, I’m at the point where I want to punch people over stuff like this all the time and it’s not even aggression in my direction since I’m, um, just a white chick who likes a lot of foods and is just fucking tired of hearing about how ~wacky~ some of them are.)

Not to mention there’s all the ableist aspects of referring to food one finds odd as “crazy,” “wacky,” etc — not just weird, puzzling or gross but mentally disturbed.

As a mixed race, third culture kid who grew up with a lot of foods that Westerners (esp. white ones) consider wacky/crazy/gross, and who didn’t grow up with many foods that Westerners consider perfectly normal, I get really frustrated with this mindset. Like, people will make this giant production about how bizarre or gross it is to eat durian, say, or tofu — then turn around and happily chow down on chili cheese fries or whatever. I promise, it’s just as weird if you didn’t grow up with it! (Possibly even weirder, given the possible conflicts with religious dietary restrictions and so on.)

I’m aware there are regional Western foods that are subject to a certain amount of confusion or ridicule from other Westerners as well — haggis, poutine, etc. — but I only rarely encounter the same kind of prurient vehemence in those discussions as I see in ones about non-Western foods. (And when they do there’s usually some kind of classism, nationalism or other kind of -ism at play, anyway.)

12,512 notes