"Think about me when you’re living your life one day after another, all in a neat pattern. Think about the homeless traveller and his old police box, with his days like crazy paving."

(Source: doctorwhogifs, via doctorwhogifs)

otpancake asked: Hello ! What is body horror ? (i don't want to google it because i'm scared it will scare me so can you explain it to me pretty please?)

creepingmonsterism:

skalja:

Hi! It’s a subgenre of horror fiction in which the horror comes from nasty things happening to the human body — mutilation, mutation, decay, parasitism, stuff like that. Probably the most famous example is the chest-bursting alien from Alien, if you’ve seen or heard of that. Someone who’s actually a horror fan could give you a better definition, but despite my fondness for Doctor Who I am very much not a horror person.

Anyway, Eight’s novels and audios have way more body horror in them than either version of the TV show; presumably it’s easier to get away with that stuff when you don’t have to show it (also, no SFX budget required).

There’s actually a fair amount of body horror in the TVM now that I think about it—there was the regeneration that was caused by failed surgery, and of course gooey!Master. It didn’t register as terrifying because it was so fantastically ridicuous, but body horror is a weirdly consistent thread in Eight stuff.

(Also, gooey!Master was part of a general 90s obsession with slime, ooze, gack etc. I’m still trying to figure out where that comes from.)

Most of it is pretty laughable, but the actual moment where Grace “kills” Seven as well as the part where Eight pulls surgical bits out of his chest still get to me.

saviltride:

degenezijde:

mizpollard:

oh swoon, I’ve never seen these photos before.

Sexy.

I always mourned the fact that we didn’t get to see more of this TARDIS.

(Source: trekintodarkness)

doctorwhogifs:

TARDIS interiors - the Seventh and Eighth Doctor’s console room

Australian talk show interviews Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy, and Paul McGann in honor of the upcoming 50th anniversary.

My two favorite things about this interview:

1. That one of the interviewers is an excitable fanboy while the other has her “It’s my job to smile at these people even though I have no idea who they are" smile on so hard.

2. That Paul McGann is obviously a Time Lord. It’s been seventeen years since the movie and he looks almost the same.

On the Eighth Man Bound

creepingmonsterism:

I wrote this in the comments on Tardis Eruditorum. People seem to have liked it, so I’m reposting it here, with few modifications to tighten the wording and correct grammar errors

From “This Bank and Shoal of Time: A Brief Anti-History of the Time War” (partially excerpted from Doctor Who?: His Lives and Time) by Dr. Anastasia Calderón, originally published in volume 57 of the Transgalactic Journal of Anarchaeology:

There has always been a Time War. Or rather, there always would have been a Time War. Dealing with tenses can be a difficult task with regard to the Time Lords. But a catastrophic war which spans time and space and leads to the destruction of Gallifrey has always been part of its history from the very beginning. The Enemy was always changing—the Order of the Black Sun, the Daleks (at least twice), the Dire Wraiths, Varnax, the Divergents, the Hounds of Carcosa… But for every enemy the Time Lord managed to stop, or ensure never existed in the first place, a new one came into being, usually one created by the Time Lords themselves in the process of trying to stop the previous one. Because that’s how empires work. If you have a cause, you need to have an enemy to give it meaning. And the ‘Decline and Fall,’ as the Old Earth historian Gibbon put it, is part of the story of every empire since history was first written. The concept of empire contains its own undoing.

The Time Lords tried to get around this by constantly rewriting their history. They built their culture around the “Laws of Time,” but like all such sacred laws, quietly broke them when no one was looking. The so-called “Celestial Intervention Agency” began as a smokescreen for the Time Lords’ interference in their own past to avert its inevitable destruction… The “Moment” was not the first time Gallifrey was destroyed, nor, most likely, the first it was destroyed by the Doctor. 

And the Doctor himself must have been, on some level, aware of this. He is said to have participated in a ritual known as “Eighth Man Bound,” in which he foresaw his future incarnations up until the eighth. This means that he must have known that his own people were, in some sense, destined to die, and by his own hand. This was in all likelihood not the beginning of the Doctor’s radicalism or alienation from his people; according to the Matrix shards we have currently recovered, the astronomical conjunction necessary for performing the ritual would have to have come after the time of the Otherstide student riots (though it is not clear that the shards all come from the same version of history). The concept of destiny, of course, is highly problematic with regard to a race that can and did rewrite time, and a member of that race who made a point of disrupting patterns of history. And this was not the Doctor’s only possible end; one account tells of his encounter with the corpse of his future self, who died during the great war to come. But all the possible patterns of history in which some good could remain in the universe converged upon one point: the Doctor’s destruction of Gallifrey.

The Doctor does not seem to have been consistently aware of this fact throughout his life. Through most of it, after he left Gallifrey, it seems to have retreated into his subconscious, sleeping in his mind. He may have regained an awareness of his “fate” in his seventh life, which motivated him to take on the role of “Time’s Champion.” He systematically destroyed or neutralized several threats that could potentially become the Enemy, including the Daleks themselves, and did his utmost to bring about reform in Gallifrey. (In one version of history, he guided Ace to become a Time Lord, in another, he masterminded Romana’s ascension to the presidency.) He moved heaven and earth to change the patterns of history, nearly losing his soul in the process.

And he failed. That failure must have haunted him greatly toward the end of his life. Perhaps this was the reason why he reconfigured the TARDIS as a Gothic ruin full of ticking clocks—counting down to the inevitable end—and spent the last moments of his life reading The Time Machine, a book about a man confronting the decay and death of his species, as the once-great chessmaster prepared for a pointless death at the hands of a gang of thugs.

And yet, at the same time, that failure seems to have given him a sense of freedom. At some point the Doctor realized his attempts to repair the engines of history, if carried too far, would ultimately damage both him and them. And so he chose instead to live life on the human level, embracing the moment and seeing people as people rather than as pawns, freeing him from the chains of godhood.

The Doctor’s eighth incarnation was a paradoxical and confusing one, about which it is difficult to determine anything definite. (Thiis life seems to echo the ancient Gallifreyan nursery rhyme: “Eighth Man Bound, make no sound/The shroud covers all.”) But we can see that this double-edged hope and despair was what shaped the Doctor’s eighth life. It is shown in his persona, inspired by the popular image of the Romantic poet. This persona reflected his sponteneity and passion, but also the Promethean revolutionary fire that burned in his heart. What’s more, the Victorian clothes he wore suggested an age of imperial idealism whose hopes would be dashed by a devastating war, and indeed, some accounts suggest he wore clothing taken from World War I in the latter part of his life.

This, then, was the Eighth Doctor, a man defined throughout his life (or lives) by paradox. A good and kind man who would be responsible for unspeakable crimes. A man who letting himself be bound by the chains of fate, freed the universe. The Champion of Life and the Bringer of Death. The victim and murderer of history. The Eighth Man Bound.

This is really awesome, yo.

doctorwho:

Big Finish to release 50th Anniversary Audio Play in November


In November 2013, Big Finish will be releasing Doctor Who: The Light at the End, a very special 100-minute story to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of Doctor Who. Tom Baker (1974-81), Peter Davison (1982-84), Colin Baker (1984-86), Sylvester McCoy (1987-89) and Paul McGann (1996) will all reprise their roles as, respectively, the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Doctors, whose paths suddenly intersect when they face imminent destruction.
“We wanted to do a proper, fully-fledged multi-Doctor story for this very special occasion,” says writer, director and executive producer Nicholas Briggs, “and it’s wonderful that all the surviving Doctors threw themselves behind the project so enthusiastically. That’s not to say the first three Doctors don’t appear – we wanted to pay homage to the whole history of the classic series.”
The Doctors will also be joined by a number of their regular companions: Louise Jameson reprises the role of the savage Leela, Sarah Sutton plays the scientist Nyssa, Nicola Bryant is American botany student Peri, Sophie Aldred is streetwise kid Ace and India Fisher returns as Edwardian adventurer Charley Pollard.
“And that’s not all,” says producer David Richardson, “because Geoffrey Beevers is back to create mayhem as the Master, and there will be a number of appearances from some much-cherished old friends from the TV series…”
Doctor Who: The Light at the End will be released in two different versions. A five-disc limited special edition comes with two hour-long documentaries, plus The Revenants, a Companion Chronicles tale which began life as a free Doctor Who Magazine download. It’s performed by William Russell, who starred in the very first TV story as Ian Chesterton. The special edition comes in beautiful special packaging, and will include a number of exclusive professionally photographed images of the cast.
The standard edition comprises two discs, featuring the two hour-long episodes of the story.

doctorwho:

Big Finish to release 50th Anniversary Audio Play in November

In November 2013, Big Finish will be releasing Doctor Who: The Light at the End, a very special 100-minute story to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of Doctor Who. Tom Baker (1974-81), Peter Davison (1982-84), Colin Baker (1984-86), Sylvester McCoy (1987-89) and Paul McGann (1996) will all reprise their roles as, respectively, the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Doctors, whose paths suddenly intersect when they face imminent destruction.

“We wanted to do a proper, fully-fledged multi-Doctor story for this very special occasion,” says writer, director and executive producer Nicholas Briggs, “and it’s wonderful that all the surviving Doctors threw themselves behind the project so enthusiastically. That’s not to say the first three Doctors don’t appear – we wanted to pay homage to the whole history of the classic series.”

The Doctors will also be joined by a number of their regular companions: Louise Jameson reprises the role of the savage Leela, Sarah Sutton plays the scientist Nyssa, Nicola Bryant is American botany student Peri, Sophie Aldred is streetwise kid Ace and India Fisher returns as Edwardian adventurer Charley Pollard.

“And that’s not all,” says producer David Richardson, “because Geoffrey Beevers is back to create mayhem as the Master, and there will be a number of appearances from some much-cherished old friends from the TV series…”

Doctor Who: The Light at the End will be released in two different versions. A five-disc limited special edition comes with two hour-long documentaries, plus The Revenants, a Companion Chronicles tale which began life as a free Doctor Who Magazine download. It’s performed by William Russell, who starred in the very first TV story as Ian Chesterton. The special edition comes in beautiful special packaging, and will include a number of exclusive professionally photographed images of the cast.

The standard edition comprises two discs, featuring the two hour-long episodes of the story.

angelophile:

tumblebuggie:

[destroyer of worlds]
i don’t like the path Eleven is on, there’s too much 7 in him. manipulative and alien, don’t even bat an eyelash after a planet blows up, dancing about it even.

For my 50th Anniversary I want Seven and Eight and Nine and Ten and Eleven.

Seconded!

angelophile:

tumblebuggie:

[destroyer of worlds]

i don’t like the path Eleven is on, there’s too much 7 in him. manipulative and alien, don’t even bat an eyelash after a planet blows up, dancing about it even.


For my 50th Anniversary I want Seven and Eight and Nine and Ten and Eleven.

Seconded!

372 notes

queencardigan:

skalja:

“I’d trust him with my life,” said [General] Kramer. “But he never invited me over for dinner, you know what I mean? We just saved the world and got on with it.” She turned the knob, found the door was unlocked, and stepped inside. “And I don’t think either of us was pushing to be any closer friends than that.”

“Adrienne!” The Doctor bounded into the foyer with a huge smile on his face, and before Kramer was even through the door he had grasped her hand in both of his. He shook it enthusiastically as she stood there with her mouth working up and down in confusion. “It’s been absolutely ages. So how’s everything back in Washington? How are George and the little ones? Not that they’re little any more, not by this point in time. Be sure to tell young Adam I said hello. I saw him at his university last year. Good job on handling that Brieri scouting party, by the way. Well, come on into the kitchen, there’s pancakes and toast and eggs for everyone…”

Kramer looked like she’d just been hit in the face with a cream pie.

Vampire Science, Kate Orman & Jonathan Blum.

The Seventh Doctor vs. the Eighth, in a nutshell.

Kate Orman is one of my favorite people to ever write the Doctor.

I’m doing the EDA readalong at Henrietta Street, and I’m really looking forward to her other books, especially The Year of Intelligent Tigers (which is a long ways away, since we’ve only just started…)