johannesviii:

Headcanons for Charley’s and C’rizz’s rooms aboard the TARDIS.

  • Yes, that’s a phonograph connected to a mp3 player. Because it’s much more convenient that way.
  • Charley is writing her “Memoirs of an Edwardian Adventuress”.
  • I can’t imagine her room as a tidy one, so, yeah, there’s stuff everywhere.
  • C’rizz is looking at the beads made out of bones that he apparently kept as a souvenir (they talk about them at the beginning of Absolution). I always imagined the Absolver like one of these crystal bombs from Myst IV, though…
  • The TARDIS knows that he’s homesick and tries to recreate views of his homeworld on the wall. It often makes things worse, unfortunately.

Eight doesn’t need a bedroom because he doesn’t sleep a lot. He probably just falls asleep on the TARDIS’ console for an hour or so.

These are perfect!

229 Plays

petramarwood:

Am I really hearing “HE IS SO MAUVE”?!!?

And Charley’s “DOCTAH WAHT’S HAPPENIN DOCTAH” is precious.

Favorite team TARDIS! Even though this scene takes on a distressing gloss by the end of this story, let alone Other Lives.

helloteeceeblog:


The scrawls on the floor weren’t important, not in themselves. They were just aids to his concentration. Ways to help him think through the equations in his head. Ways to make his neurosystem lock on to the details of the temporal mechanics, and… trigger them.
The TARDIS was modelled out of solid mathematics. That was no secret, of course. But whenever he told his companions that, they always assumed he meant just the physical material. They didn’t understand the way these things worked, the subtleties of the Ship’s engineering. The TARDIS was a complex space-time event. Its very existence, its very position in relation to the rest of the continuum, was just an intricate code series.
As was his. That was what Rassilon had done to his people, when the Imprimiture had been worked into the biodata of the Time Lord elite. When you had Rassilon’s gift, you were mapped on to the vortex by the numbers, linked to the heart of space-time by an umbilical cord of pure mathematics.
Just thinking about the formulae, just holding all the right equations in your head at the same time, was enough to trigger the connection and put you in a different time state.
Back at the Academy, trainee Time Lords would play games with that principle. Transmigration of object, they called it. Sometimes you could do it in a second, without thinking about it, but most of the time you had to concentrate for hours, maybe days, visualising the correct codes. Then you’d take an object, focus on it, and displace it. Use your fast line to the vortex to take it out of the continuum. It played merry hell with your biodata, the Cardinals said, but it had never stopped anyone doing it as a party trick.
It wasn’t any use at all as an escape route. Everybody knew that. 

- Interference, Book One, by Lawrence Miles

helloteeceeblog:

The scrawls on the floor weren’t important, not in themselves. They were just aids to his concentration. Ways to help him think through the equations in his head. Ways to make his neurosystem lock on to the details of the temporal mechanics, and… trigger them.

The TARDIS was modelled out of solid mathematics. That was no secret, of course. But whenever he told his companions that, they always assumed he meant just the physical material. They didn’t understand the way these things worked, the subtleties of the Ship’s engineering. The TARDIS was a complex space-time event. Its very existence, its very position in relation to the rest of the continuum, was just an intricate code series.

As was his. That was what Rassilon had done to his people, when the Imprimiture had been worked into the biodata of the Time Lord elite. When you had Rassilon’s gift, you were mapped on to the vortex by the numbers, linked to the heart of space-time by an umbilical cord of pure mathematics.

Just thinking about the formulae, just holding all the right equations in your head at the same time, was enough to trigger the connection and put you in a different time state.

Back at the Academy, trainee Time Lords would play games with that principle. Transmigration of object, they called it. Sometimes you could do it in a second, without thinking about it, but most of the time you had to concentrate for hours, maybe days, visualising the correct codes. Then you’d take an object, focus on it, and displace it. Use your fast line to the vortex to take it out of the continuum. It played merry hell with your biodata, the Cardinals said, but it had never stopped anyone doing it as a party trick.

It wasn’t any use at all as an escape route. Everybody knew that. 

- Interference, Book One, by Lawrence Miles

johannesviii:

A bunch of quick doodles of Eight, Charley and C’rizz I’ve drawn today when I wasn’t painting surreal stuff or flying turtles (that one isn’t finished yet), or just slacking off because VACATIONS! YAY!

johannesviii:

More quick doodles with Eight, Charley, and C’rizz (mostly Eight and Charley this time). As usual, everything is sketched with a ballpoint pen because I like to suffer because I like to be unable to correct my mistakes just because.

A couple of them (the first ones) were drawn while my friends and I were lost in Toulouse - we were sitting on the pavement while one of us was trying to read a map of the town on his phone.

johannesviii:

Eight’s TARDIS can display all sorts of things on the ceiling of its control room, and if you still don’t think it’s the best TARDIS ever, you’re wrong I kindly disagree with your opinion.
I’m pretty sure one of the first things he did once Charley was on board was to show her how the Earth looked like from space. [/headcanon]

johannesviii:

Eight’s TARDIS can display all sorts of things on the ceiling of its control room, and if you still don’t think it’s the best TARDIS ever, you’re wrong I kindly disagree with your opinion.

I’m pretty sure one of the first things he did once Charley was on board was to show her how the Earth looked like from space. [/headcanon]

"Charlie and I are members of the Tourist faith. We worship C’rizz here. And we begin each day with a ritual cup of tea. Happy?"

The Eighth Doctor, in the “Faith Stealer” audio, answering a question about his religion. (via 1outside)

On period-appropriate attire.

Charley: Another opportunity to wear a nice dress!
Eighth Doctor: Be a bit conspicuous, wouldn't it?
Charley: ... An opportunity for ME.
~Seasons of Fear, Paul Cornell
johannesviii:

Zagreus isn’t one of my favorite stories, but there’s something fascinating about its concept, even if I don’t really like its execution.
My brother saw this and asked questions about the background. I told him it was Eight’s TARDIS, showed him some pictures of it, and said it was my favorite. He answered “oh, is it because it looks like something from Myst?” AND HOLY SHIT HE’S RIGHT. I NEVER REALISED HOW MYST-LIKE THAT TARDIS LOOKED UNTIL NOW. That explains a lot.

johannesviii:

Zagreus isn’t one of my favorite stories, but there’s something fascinating about its concept, even if I don’t really like its execution.

My brother saw this and asked questions about the background. I told him it was Eight’s TARDIS, showed him some pictures of it, and said it was my favorite. He answered “oh, is it because it looks like something from Myst?” AND HOLY SHIT HE’S RIGHT. I NEVER REALISED HOW MYST-LIKE THAT TARDIS LOOKED UNTIL NOW. That explains a lot.